§3.21. The player's holdall

When the player has only limited carrying capacity, game play is likely to be tiresome, but we can make life easier by providing a way for the player to carry endless items without dozens of free hands to hold them all:

"Sackcloth"

The Attic is a room. The old blue rucksack is a player's holdall. The player is wearing the rucksack.

The carrying capacity of the player is 3.

In the Attic are a CD entitled No Smoke Without Fire, a 70s photograph of an American winning Wimbledon, a fraxinus branch, an urn holding your late great-aunt's remains, a convention badge from the American Society of Hypertension and a ghost story by M R James.

This example game introduces a new kind of container, the "player's holdall". This is a kind of which most games will contain at most one example, but in principle there can be any number. A player's holdall is a capacious bag into which the player automatically places surplus items whenever his or her hands are full: trying the above example game and getting the items one by one will give the general idea.

Of course, if the carrying capacity of the player is never reached then there will never be any surplus items and a player's holdall will behave just like any other (portable, usually openable) container.


* See Units for the tools to implement a more sophisticated capacity system


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*ExampleDisenchantment Bay 11
Disenchantment Bay: making a holdall of the backpack.